Why Attend IFBC 2017

Food Bloggers Conference

 

Disclosure : As an IFBC Citizen Blogger, I received a reduced conference rate in exchange for sharing three posts about my experience. This is the first of three. 

If it wasn’t for a little race called Ironman, I would have attended the International Food Blogger Conference (IFBC) 2016 conference, held in Sacramento, CA. But wait! What does an Ironman race have to do with interfering with plans to attend a food blogging conference?

Well, actually, Ironman training made a great many decisions for me in 2016, from what available time I had, who I socialized with,  how much and when to eat, and yes — even determining what conferences I could attend.

Last year, I spent 15-20 hours a week on top of my hours in the office as a private practice counselor, training for Ironman Mont-Tremblant. Every spare hour was spent in the pool or in the lake, riding my bike on a trainer or up and down hills, and running for hours. To do all those things, I also had to grocery shop, prep, and cook all my own meals and make my own race food.  Over time, my needs grew to the point that I could not eat outside my home, and could not spare even a day of food sensitivity by making inferior food choices. When the IFBC 2016 dates were announced, I realized they were just too close to the dates of my race, creating some risk for the Celiac athlete to try new food combinations or sample beverages. It didn’t make sense to put my race in jeopardy, so I took the conference off my plate (pun intended).

When I heard that the IFBC would return to Sacramento in 2017, my mind was made up: I would come back again. This was an exciting development, because I was really kicking myself for having missed the 2016 conference at that specific location.  This post is about why I’m attending IFBC 2017 as a “citizen blogger” for the second time. And it’s also about why you as a reader should care.

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Trello For Meal Planning and Prepping

Screen shot of part of my Maui Menu Plan for the March Triathlon camp. I used Trello to help me prepare, including a shopping list for Day 1.
Screen shot of part of my Maui Menu Plan for the March Triathlon camp. I used Trello to help me prepare, including a shopping list for Day 1. Photo by Imei Hsu.

How do you keep track of your food allergies, intolerances, and sensitivities? How do you track your Elimination/Provocation schedule? Do you have a way to systematically think about rotating in a new recipe, and getting the ingredients on your grocery shopping list earlier in the week so that you’re not caught making multiple trips to the store? How do you organize links from websites with interesting information about foods, supplements, and treatments for your gastrointestinal and allergy issues?

First of all, I want to tell you this: IT’S A LOT. To eat well, to eat healthy and clean, and to eat nutrient-dense food free of chemicals, and emulsifiers, processed ingredients and processing cross-contamination, sugars, and unhealthy fats and oils,  you have to do a lot of fancy footwork and planning.

For many of us with Autoimmune Disease and fatigue, we simply don’t have the available energy for those extra trips to the grocery store, let alone standing at the stove and oven, prepping, cooking, and baking. At the worst of my own disease process, just standing at the stove for five minutes left me too tired to eat. Even the joints in my feet ached.

At the time of writing this post, I was planning from a couch, resting from travel and a food “incident” on the return flight of my trip to New Orleans to deliver a presentation on food and mood. I started using Trello.com as a project management system for my eating lifestyle in early 2016, and I love how I can use it plan out my week, month, and repeat previous week’s menus to keep my food varied, interesting, nutritious, and flexible to my changing needs. I can also use it to plan special events, travel food, and holiday meal planning.

Read on to learn about Trello’s features you can hack for your own eating lifestyle.

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Living in the Land of the Gluteneaters

Gluten | Gluten-Free Living | Home | Health | Food Allergies

Stack of Kirkland pizzas in pizza boxes on the corner of a table
When gluten is all around, how do you figure out how to cope when you can’t eat it but must be around it?

In 2014, I entered my first race Olympic Distance race as a relay, the Victoria BC Subaru Saunders Olympic Distance Triathlon. I took on the 0.9mile swim event, M took on the 27 mile bike event, and a fellow runner friend Rosie took on the 10 kilometer run around Elk Lake. When it came to giving our team a name, I ended up submitting the team name, “Imei and the Gluteneaters.”

Three seasons later, and an Ironman Finisher now going on for her first Ultramarathon, I’m reflecting on what it means to live — and I mean fully live — in the Land of the Gluteneaters.

If you must be gluten-free for medically necessary reasons (meaning: you must avoid gluten or you will become seriously ill or risk severe complications or death), avoiding gluten in your food is a complex enough task by itself, since much of our food supply in westernized countries are embedded with gluten and cross-contaminated as well as cross-reactive ingredients. What happens if you live with others who eat gluten? What happens if you live with others who eat the foods you are most reactive to, such as nuts, dairy, gluten, soy? What if you have multiple food allergies, and your partner/spouse does not?

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New Year Celebration Mindshift

New Year’s Eve |  Celebration | Ideas

Wondering how to celebrate New Year's Eve and other special occasions safely? Cultivate a Celebration Mindshift, and you'll be making your own memories without the worry of food-related accidents.
Wondering how to celebrate New Year’s Eve and other special occasions safely? Cultivate a Celebration Mindshift, and you’ll be making your own memories without the worry of food-related accidents.

One of my pet peeves as a Food Allergic Person (FAP) happens almost every time I want to take part in large-scale celebration. Let’s say it’s an upcoming New Year’s Eve event at a beautiful hotel. The organizer is selling tickets to the posh event, and the tickets are available in a number of levels. Here’s an example:

1. Bells and Whistles. Pay $$$$ for tickets, and you get a premium table in the VIP room and seating, access to a full-food buffet, unlimited drink tickets, and arrangements for safe transportation to and from the event.

2. A Bell and A Whistle. Pay $$$ for tickets, you get a table in the main room, access to the full-food buffet, three drink tickets, and you arrange your own safe transportation.

3. No Bells and No Whistles.  Pay $$ for tickets, no table (stand up and eat), access to the full-food buffet, two drink tickets, and you arrange your own safe transportation.

4. There is no option #4 (except being told, “We can’t help you.”).

For the FAP and people on a medically-necessary diet, , packages #1 through #3 are useless to us (and in many cases, dangerous to us). You are paying for food and drink that you should not consume unless you are completely prepared to play roulette with your health and safety.

With cross-contamination, poorly marked foods, and unclear ingredients, you do not know what you are consuming. If you have food sensitivities, you may also encounter them when consuming alcohol, which most of us also know are highly discouraged if you have GI issues, Autoimmune Disease, or have multiple food allergies or intolerances, because alcohol can inflame your GI tract. And you know the saying: hell hath no fury like a GI tract scorned.

Every year since I was diagnosed with Autoimmune Disease and multiple severe food allergies, New Year’s plans and other special occasions  are an important consideration, and one that can be embedded with emotional stories as we try to celebrate with family and friends. This year, make sure you get through the maze not only intact, but with flying colors.

Let’s help you make New Year’s celebrations fun again, shall we? Continue reading

Eat Like You

During the holidays, we think about what we're eating more than ever (or, we try not to think about it!). How do you navigate the world of food when you have food allergies, intolerances, or a GI disorder)? Photo credit: Imei Hsu (2016).
During the holidays, we think about what we’re eating more than ever (or, we try not to think about it!). How do you navigate the world of food when you have food allergies, intolerances, or a GI disorder)? Photo credit: Imei Hsu (2016).

Stop trying to eat like everyone else. Just STOP.

On any given week, I receive well-intended yet unhelpful suggestions from people who believe they can “help” me. Sometimes it’s from a well-meaning Vegan person who thinks my Paleo options are not only immoral and cruel, they are unhealthy for me. As usual, I kindly ask that person to design me a minimum 1538 calorie meal plan free from nuts, dairy, seeds, soy, legumes,  beans, gluten (including no corn), alliums, goards (pumpkin, squash, cucumbers), and certain oils,  certain sugars, plus more calories on my training days that are easily absorbed, do not cause my guts to rebel and fall apart, and deliver iron, protein, and healthy fat well enough that I don’t suffer a loss in cognitive processing.

Every person I’ve encountered who has looked at that list usually tells me it cannot be done without severely compromising my health.

And so, here I am again, stating the obvious: nutrition is an individual matter. Stop eating like everyone else.

Instead, eat like only you can, and only you should:. Eat like you.

Among my friends, they have a reply to newcomers who mean well when they suggest a food or new recipe to me: “That sounds safe, but is it ‘Imei safe’?

They say this because I am my own canary in a coal mine: if it isn’t safe for me to eat, it might not be so good  for them either. Why? Because while all of the ingredients in processed foods are FDA-approved for public safety, a good amount of them will still leave me writhing on the floor, vomiting, cramping, racing for the toilets, or leading to poor nutritional status over time.

Yet the real truth of eating well and transforming your life is a journey of discovery, trial and error, and extreme customization. What we’re learning more than ever is that a nutritional profile that works for one may not work perfectly for another.

The good news: there exists one shared food factor among those who have autoimmune disease and food allergies, one in which no health expert would ever argue against. It is a simple equation: eat a natural diet free from highly processed foods.

By doing so, you will not eat in the manner of everyone else.  You will eat like you.

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Bacon Wrapped Duck with Cranberry Mandarin Orange Sauce

Bacon Wrapped Duck with Cranberry Mandarin Orange Sauce

Next time you need a special-occasion meal, try roasting a duck and adding a flavorful twist with cranberry and mandarin orange
Next time you need a special-occasion meal, try roasting a duck and adding a flavorful twist with cranberry and mandarin orange. Photo by Imei Hsu.

 

I don’t like Turkey. There, I said it. Gawd. I don’t like turkey meat.

Even if it was cooked well, with the juices basting the meat and leaving it tender, I find that I just don’t feel the same excitement about turkey that has people jumping up and down to make the perfect turkey dinner with side dishes to feed a small neighborhood.

Just a cursory look on my Social Media feeds this week gave me a pretty clear indication that everyone else I know are sticking to the traditional Turkey Dinner and sides food theme, with a gluten-filled pie of either fruit (apple), pumpkin, or pecan, all three of which I am prohibited from inserting into my pie hole.

Needless to say, my pie hole doesn’t get much pie on my special diet.

Since this isn’t a traditional Thanksgiving Day recipe, I decided to hold off trying to create one for the blog by Thanksgiving Day Nov. 24, 2016. Instead, I present to you a roast duck recipe that you can eat any time of the year, for a special occasion, holiday feast, or whenever you get a hankering for roast duck with a nutrient-dense, AIP friendly twist.   Continue reading

Sweet Potato Toaster Grilled Sammich

Sweet Potato Toaster and Grilled Sammich

White plate, with two slices of grilled sweet potato, one with nothing on it on the left, and one slice with ingredients piled on it on the right
Learn how easy it is to make your own Sweet Potato toaster (or toaster oven) Sandwich (bread free), Photo credit: Imei Hsu.

When you get a diagnosis of a food allergy, multiple food allergies, and/or a medical condition that improves with the removal of gluten and other grains, soy, corn, and milk dairy, it’s pretty natural to become not only hungry, but also angry (aka “hangry”). You become hangry because you don’t get to eat the familiar, tasty, and convenient foods that you see all around you. Suddenly, these popular foods sing their songs of exuberance:

“I am here, look at me!”

“I am so tasty, you want me more than sex, money, or power!”

These foods jeer too. “Ha ha,you can’t have me!”

Since the beginning, MyAllergyAdocate has been all about a lifestyle that holds naturally gluten-free foods that are also free of the main food allergens at the center, and foods that can be adapted to be compliant with a number of different dietary plans designed for people who are fighting autoimmune disease and other chronic medical conditions. I am not about “phood”; I am about real food, for real people,

In waltzes a lovely idea from the Internets, this one from Los Angeles by a well-followed food blogger Kelsey Preciado, who wasn’t even thinking about this food community; she was just thinking about making a sandwich, and she had no bread in the house. She substituted slices of sweet potato, and instead of grilling it on the stove top or in the oven, she put them in her inexpensive Oster toaster, and voila! Within two cycles of toasting, she had a cute, grain-free sandwich that could potentially pack a wallop of nutrients. Taking to Instagram, she has the first date and time-stamped example of this new food trend, and so I’m giving credit where credit is due. Thank you, Kelsey! You’re awesomesauce!

That was in May 2016, and ever since, food bloggers and followers have been posting hundreds of variations of this easy-to-create mouthful sensation. And for us hangry, Hungry Minions, this is good news! We can take that basic idea and make it work for us too.

Ready? Read on.  Continue reading